Deliberate practice and lawyering skills

This past weekend, the Legal Writing Institute hosted its second Biennial Moot Court Conference at John Marshall Law School in Chicago. Several of the talks touched on listening-related themes. Kent Streseman of the Chicago-Kent College of Law explored the concept of “deliberate practice” for moot court competitors. His summary of the tenets of deliberate practice … Continue reading Deliberate practice and lawyering skills

Future trial lawyers, take heart

Listen Like a Lawyer will be delving into communication and writing in the next few posts. One reason this blog is generally dedicated to listening is that there are already many excellent legal-writing blogs available for the legal community. (For example: Forma Legalis, Lady Legal Writer, Law Prose, Legible,  and Ziff Blog, just to cite … Continue reading Future trial lawyers, take heart

You should watch The People v. O.J. Simpson

To echo what many have said, I now know what I’ll be doing for the next ten Tuesday nights. The People v. O.J. Simpson: An American Crime Story (FX Networks) is as incredible as everyone is saying. For viewers who lived through the spectacle, it brings back memories (“Where was I the night of the … Continue reading You should watch The People v. O.J. Simpson

Do you know it when you hear it?

  When taking a deposition, can you immediately recognize the testimony you want to quote in a later dispositive motion? Do the words jump out at you like a “nugget” in a “treasure hunt”? Legal writing and nonfiction writing have a lot in common, as a recent New Yorker article by John McPhee suggested. I … Continue reading Do you know it when you hear it?

The 4 T’s of Listening

One of Listen Like a Lawyer’s most enduringly popular posts is "A Model of Listening." The honest truth about why it’s so popular appears to be that students enrolled in listening classes are doing searches like these: models of listening model of listening HURIER model HURIER model of listening One clue that these are college … Continue reading The 4 T’s of Listening

A myth about listening and learning

Listening is a loser, at least according to the widely circulated Pyramid of Learning: I've been hearing about the Pyramid of Learning -- also known Dale's Cone of Learning -- since I was a child. Yet it has a problem. Specifically, a lot of credible people believe it to be "zombie learning theory that refuses to die." … Continue reading A myth about listening and learning

Yes, I’m listening to Serial. Aren’t you?

The podcast Serial has, in the past few months, become the most popular podcast ever. As a dedicated bibliophile and not much of an audiobook fan, I've been surprised to become so engrossed. Serial reinvestigates the murder of Hae Min Lee, a high-school student from Baltimore who was killed in 1999. Her ex-boyfriend, Adnan Syed, was … Continue reading Yes, I’m listening to Serial. Aren’t you?

Second-chair listening

The role of a good second-chair lawyer at trial is strategically crucial. Yet the second chair's contribution can be difficult to see, compared with that of the lead lawyer starring in the show. Two major components of the second chair's contribution are preparation (before trial) and listening (at trial). The preparation gives the second chair … Continue reading Second-chair listening