Listening to punctuation

Thanks to Julie Schrager, counsel and legal writing coach at Schiff Hardin, for this guest post.  I have been desperately trying to find a way to write about exclamation points. I grew up in a time when they were reserved for exclamations: “Congratulations on winning that game!” or “That’s the reason he got that promotion!” Lynne … Continue reading Listening to punctuation

Is attention personal or professional?

A law professor’s New York Times op-ed, “Leave Your Laptops at the Door to My Classroom,” prompted lots of discussion on blogs and Twitter. Should law students be told and required to close their screens and (to the extent this is even possible) pay attention in class?  Or should they have the freedom to decide … Continue reading Is attention personal or professional?

Resolve to Use Your Device as a Tool—and to Resist Being Tooled by It

Listen Like a Lawyer is grateful to share this post by Jack Pringle, a partner at Adams & Reese in Columbia, SC. Jack is a litigator, appellate advocate, and information technology attorney. He publishes on Medium and LinkedIn. Introduction It’s that time of year: reflection and some soul-searching about what to do differently when we … Continue reading Resolve to Use Your Device as a Tool—and to Resist Being Tooled by It

Love your lawyer (part 2): Emotional labor of lawyers

Love Your Lawyer Day prompted the question: what makes clients love their lawyers? Client satisfaction is one way to gauge clients’ love. As addressed in an earlier post, client satisfaction depends on the lawyer’s competence and expertise. But client satisfaction is also intertwined with how the client experiences the process. The client’s desire for a satisfying … Continue reading Love your lawyer (part 2): Emotional labor of lawyers

Loving your lawyer (part 1)

Last week once again America—or at least American lawyers—celebrated “Love Your Lawyer Day.” See also #loveyourlawyerday on Twitter. Beyond the marketing hype, there’s a good question: What makes people love their lawyers? The first answer is competence. A 2002 study of how the public perceives lawyers found the majority of consumer clients to be satisfied with their … Continue reading Loving your lawyer (part 1)

Categories of listening

Katrina Lee from Ohio State tweeted earlier this week: Focus on doing more empathetic #listening, < self-focused listening. Quick read fr #biglaw talent developmnt director. cc @ListenLikeaLwyr https://t.co/uwjkwIbScj — Katrina Lee (@katrinajunelee) September 20, 2016 The article referred to in her tweet is by  Jim Lovelace, Director of Talent Development at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP, and … Continue reading Categories of listening

Listening under the influence

What is the effect of drinking on listening skills? This matters for lawyers who will be networking over a glass of wine or taking clients to dinner where alcohol is served. What appears to be a still-valid 1975 psychiatric study predicted that drinking would have a variety of effects on communication: In a group setting, low to … Continue reading Listening under the influence

Speaking “business”

Listen Like a Lawyer is a fan of several lawyers who write and blog in ways that touch on listening skills, including but not limited to* Jeena Cho, Keith Lee, Lee Rosen, and Pam Woldow. Another highly, highly recommended blog resource on listening and lawyering is this six-part series from Mark Perlmutter on Trebuchet Legal. And then … Continue reading Speaking “business”

Listening until it hurts

Recently I tried a workout at Orangetheory. This is a relatively new exercise franchise offering intense one-hour workouts with running, rowing, lifting, and uncountable numbers of crunches. Everyone wears a heart monitor, and throughout the workout you can check out the monitor to see just how hard you and your heart are working—as well as … Continue reading Listening until it hurts

Why it’s so hard to be understood

Among Listen Like a Lawyer's summer reading is Heidi Grant Halvorson's No One Understands You and What To Do About It (Harvard Business Review Press 2015). Halvorson is a professor at Columbia Business School; here she is interviewed by CBS News about the book. The book's focus is on understanding how others perceive you, so that you may … Continue reading Why it’s so hard to be understood