Listening to your own self-talk: a challenge during law school finals

Part of effective listening is dealing with what you hear from your own self-talk. As reported by Susan David and Christina Congleton in their Harvard Business Review article on Emotional Agility, we speak on average 16,000 words per day--out loud. A comment to the article suggests that internal self-talk generates 20,000-40,000 "neurological" words per day. … Continue reading Listening to your own self-talk: a challenge during law school finals

Mark my words: Listening to “discourse markers” to be a better listener

Spontaneous speech doesn’t fit together like Legos. Because speech reflects a sometimes messy thought process in real time, spoken transition words and phrases—what the linguists call “discourse markers”—serve a crucial purpose in conversation. Discourse markers can be as empty as “I mean,” as overused as “clearly,” or as specific as “at the end of the … Continue reading Mark my words: Listening to “discourse markers” to be a better listener

Lawyers and hearing loss: seeking input

Earlier today I participated in a very difficult conference call. I was listening on a handheld cordless phone. On the receiving end, a cellphone set to speaker was on the table surrounded by seven people. These folks—who made every conscious effort to include me—also conducted the meeting in the grand tradition of meetings, often mumbling, … Continue reading Lawyers and hearing loss: seeking input

Getting Better at Listening

Thanks to the International Listening Association, I learned of this video  from HuffPost Live. It's a quick, fun, informative look at problems with listening and ideas for improving. The panelists offer suggestions for managing your own thought process when you feel like you're about to "check out." The panelists also delve into different types of … Continue reading Getting Better at Listening

Is It Ever Okay Not to Listen to Your Client?

Listening to clients seems like mostly an affirmative duty, if only an implied one. But in writing about lawyers' duty *not* to listen to represented parties, I began to wonder about the limits of a lawyer's duty to listen to clients as well: Can a lawyer ever choose not to hear what the client has … Continue reading Is It Ever Okay Not to Listen to Your Client?