Listening check-up for first-semester law students

Every fall, every entering class of 1Ls faces a “paradox of comprehension,” writes Kris Franklin of New York Law School (here).  These brand-new law students have neither a framework for understanding legal concepts nor a solid legal vocabulary. Yet they have to somehow learn the law. As Franklin asks, “How do [they] enter this apparently … Continue reading Listening check-up for first-semester law students

Celebrating National Punctuation Day by listening to punctuation

Listening to what you’ve written can be immensely helpful in revising and editing your work. “Read it out loud” is a time-tested technique for self-editing.  As Forbes magazine proclaimed, “To write like a human, read your work out loud.”  Listening to your own writing can help with all stages of the writing process: analysis (recognizing … Continue reading Celebrating National Punctuation Day by listening to punctuation

Listening to children: practice pointers from an expert

Listen Like a Lawyer welcomes guest blogger Karen Worthington, a writer, consultant and children's policy attorney. A recent verbal exchange with my five-year-old ended like this: Impatient mother: "We are going to be late for practice. I told you three times to pack your snack and water. Didn't you hear me?" Unflappable daughter: "I heard … Continue reading Listening to children: practice pointers from an expert

Guest post on Legal Productivity: 5 Benefits of Effective Listening

Effective listening is crucial to establishing rapport with clients, witnesses, and anyone, really. But effective listening also contributes to lawyers’ analysis, strategy, and future workload in several concrete ways. Effective listening helps lawyers find the right narrative for the facts, avoid nasty surprises, and generate more work--in a good way. Read more in my guest post … Continue reading Guest post on Legal Productivity: 5 Benefits of Effective Listening

Effective Listening During Fact Investigation

Today Listen Like a Lawyer brings you this conversation with Emory Law Professor Paul Zwier, director of Emory's Advocacy Skills Program, co-author of Fact Investigation: Interviewing, Case Analysis, and Case Theory Development, and noted speaker with the National Institute of Trial Advocacy. Many thanks to Professor Zwier for sharing his thoughts on establishing a rapport with … Continue reading Effective Listening During Fact Investigation

Updated listening resources

This week's end-of-the-week update highlights Listen Like a Lawyer's growing list of listening resources. The list is here, and can always be found on the left panel of the blog in the menu item "Listening Resources." The updates include several articles from the Harvard Business Review and the HBR Blog, as well a number of … Continue reading Updated listening resources

The Lawyer’s Ethical Duty Not to Listen

Lawyers have a duty to listen to their clients, as discussed in an earlier post. Lawyers also have a duty not to listen to certain information. Do not listen to a person represented by another lawyer. A lawyer may not listen to information provided by a person represented by counsel, as set forth in Model … Continue reading The Lawyer’s Ethical Duty Not to Listen

A “KISS Principle” for Listening

This post continues Listen Like a Lawyer's end-of-the-week tradition of sharing short links, images, and other concise content about listening. In the college textbook Listening: Process, Functions, and Competency, authors Debra Worthington and Margaret Fitch-Hauser present brief advice from a trial consultant about listening. “For attorneys, one of the key principles to listening well begins … Continue reading A “KISS Principle” for Listening

Listening and e-mail

A recent critique of “digital dualism” got me thinking about lawyers, listening, and e-mail. Digital dualism refers to the mindset that online digital life is something different—and the frequent implication is: something less—than authentic “real life.” This blog may at times veer to close to digital dualism, as in this early post. It is pretty easy to … Continue reading Listening and e-mail