Facilitating Dialogue Across Difference

Many thanks to Gail Silverstein, Clinical Professor of Law at the UC Hastings College of the Law, for this guest post about the ABA Section of Dispute Resolution's recent conference. Gail co-directs and co-teaches an Individual Representation Clinic and a Mediation Clinic at UC Hastings.   The 19th Annual Spring Conference of the ABA Section … Continue reading Facilitating Dialogue Across Difference

Let the ice cube melt

The other day I had to have my eyes dilated. As they slowly came back into focus, I tested them on this week’s issue of The New Yorker. One of the essays focused on Allison Janney, currently starring on Broadway in “Six Degrees of Separation.” Janney’s character in the play owns a Kandinsky (Wassily Kandinsky, one … Continue reading Let the ice cube melt

Postscript on “um”

Yesterday I had the pleasure of moderating a Facebook chat on Rutgers law professor Barbara Gotthelf's article The Lawyer's Guide to "Um." She published it in Legal Communication & Rhetoric: JALWD (for which, full disclosure, I'm a social media editor.) The Facebook chat, available here in LC&R's ongoing Discussion Group, was a chance to explore … Continue reading Postscript on “um”

A Winning Approach to Negotiations: Self-Awareness, Flexibility, and Practice

Guest post by Katrina June Lee, Associate Clinical Professor, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law On September 21, the Moritz College of Law hosted the incomparable Marya Cody Kolman as its 2016 Lawrence Lecturer, named in honor of lawyer and law school educator James K. L. Lawrence (Moritz ‘65). A Yale Law grad, … Continue reading A Winning Approach to Negotiations: Self-Awareness, Flexibility, and Practice

Tomorrow’s lawyers

What do lawyers need to be good lawyers? A project in Denver is investing a lot of time, energy, and resources into answering that question. It’s the Foundations for Practice study, generated by Educating Tomorrow’s Lawyers, an initiative of the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System. The background on Foundations for Practice … Continue reading Tomorrow’s lawyers

More on flow and listening

Feeling "flow" means being fully immersed in a challenging task, with a sense of energy and enjoyment. Lawyers might find flow when they have enough skilled experience to know what they're doing and encounter a new challenge using their skills, as previously mentioned in this post. The founder of flow theory, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, created a … Continue reading More on flow and listening

The “romance” in learning to listen

Education comes in three stages: romance precision generalization This is according to A.N. Whitehead’s “rhythm of education,” a framework widely shared last month in The Atlantic’s profile of Teller—of Penn and Teller—as a former teacher. He tells the story of his early days as a high-school Latin teacher: Romance, argued Teller, precedes all else. “I’m 5’8” … Continue reading The “romance” in learning to listen

Do you know it when you hear it?

  When taking a deposition, can you immediately recognize the testimony you want to quote in a later dispositive motion? Do the words jump out at you like a “nugget” in a “treasure hunt”? Legal writing and nonfiction writing have a lot in common, as a recent New Yorker article by John McPhee suggested. I … Continue reading Do you know it when you hear it?

The 4 T’s of Listening

One of Listen Like a Lawyer’s most enduringly popular posts is "A Model of Listening." The honest truth about why it’s so popular appears to be that students enrolled in listening classes are doing searches like these: models of listening model of listening HURIER model HURIER model of listening One clue that these are college … Continue reading The 4 T’s of Listening

Two hemispheres of law practice

 Securities law and divorce law. Lawyers in these practice areas may not be from different planets, but they live in different “hemispheres,” according to sociological work being explored by Deborah Merritt at the Law School Café. Her first post is here and second post here. Merritt is revisiting the study Chicago Lawyers by sociologists John … Continue reading Two hemispheres of law practice