Introverted Lawyers Listen

Listen Like a Lawyer is grateful to Professor Heidi K. Brown for this guest post. Professor Brown is an Associate Professor of Law and Director of the Legal Writing Program at Brooklyn Law School. Having struggled with shyness and social anxiety as a law student and litigator and, through substantial research and self-study, embraced introversion … Continue reading Introverted Lawyers Listen

Best Practices for Law Schools and Student Organizations when Inviting Guest Speakers

This post is formatted as a draft policy on best practices for law schools and law-student organizations when they invite guests to speak to or interact with their law school community. This policy errs on the side of formality and specificity, attempting to spell out specific steps for inviting guests and planning events. Feedback is welcome, … Continue reading Best Practices for Law Schools and Student Organizations when Inviting Guest Speakers

What lawyers say, and what they actually do

How do lawyers transfer their knowledge? Lawyering scholars have been talking about “tacit knowledge” since the early 1990s. A recent ABA publication encouraged law students to use their externships and other practical experiences to interact with lawyers and try to glean some of that tacit knowledge via “extensive personal contact, regular interaction, and trust.” I … Continue reading What lawyers say, and what they actually do

Is teamwork the same as collaboration?

  Earlier this week Listen Like a Lawyer discussed Google’s teamwork study investigating the qualities of effective teams. In the post I mentioned that teamwork is so important in part because many cases are too complex for one person to manage. One bit of feedback on the post agreed that teamwork is “vital now for … Continue reading Is teamwork the same as collaboration?

Mindful interactions with colleagues

Mindfulness and listening go together in a lot of ways, some obvious and some subtle. A recent HBR Blog post, "See Colleagues as They Are, Not as They Were," challenged readers to be more mindful in working with colleagues, especially longtime colleagues. The post defines mindfulness as "noticing what is happening in the present moment, without judgment." And thus … Continue reading Mindful interactions with colleagues

The Good Lawyer

“What does it mean to be a good lawyer?” Thus begins The Good Lawyer: Seeking Quality in the Practice of Law by Douglas O. Linder & Nancy Levit (Oxford 2014). The introduction assures readers there will not be chapters such as “The Good Lawyer Uses Proper Citation Format." (Why not? asks the legal writing professor.) Instead, … Continue reading The Good Lawyer

What is listening? Q&A with Jennie Grau

One of the best things about writing this blog has been the opportunity to talk with and meet (in person, by phone, or by e-mail) a variety of communication experts. One of them is Jennie Grau, President of Grau Interpersonal Communications. Jennie has spent her career training, coaching, writing, and speaking, on the subject of … Continue reading What is listening? Q&A with Jennie Grau

Being “judgeable” is a good thing, mostly

Listen Like a Lawyer previously reviewed Heidi Grant Halvorson’s No One Understands You and What to Do About It. The review (and much of the book) focused on understanding how you are perceived, to have a more accurate effect on others. Accurate in this sense means you are perceived the way you intend to be … Continue reading Being “judgeable” is a good thing, mostly

Listening analytics?

One of my favorite sayings is from F. Scott Fitzgerald: Kenneth Grady’s Seytlines blog is an exercise in what Fitzgerald meant. In Grady’s essays on innovation in the legal industry—what it needs and where it is stagnating—human skills including “soft skills” have never been more valuable. Yet humans must use processes and systems and technology … Continue reading Listening analytics?

Why it’s so hard to be understood

Among Listen Like a Lawyer's summer reading is Heidi Grant Halvorson's No One Understands You and What To Do About It (Harvard Business Review Press 2015). Halvorson is a professor at Columbia Business School; here she is interviewed by CBS News about the book. The book's focus is on understanding how others perceive you, so that you may … Continue reading Why it’s so hard to be understood